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We welcome you, your family, and your baby to El Nada Hospital , the leading maternity hospital in Egypt dedicated to the healthcare of women and newborns. We provide a high-quality care for expectant mothers and their new babies with great emphasis on providing safe and warm environment as well as ensuring mothers and mothers to be to have the most enjoyable pregnancy and memorable birthing experience. Our integrated health care system offers exceptional care which guarantees excellence in the array of the services we are honored to provide. We are committed to the care and improvement of women’s life.

El Nada Hospital in Numbers

100000

Surgical Operations and Delivers

450

Professors and consultants

80000

Happy Mums

Our Services

Whenever you need it, we give you access to a whole range of services 24 hours a day,7 days a week. Our services fit all your needs related to gynecology, pregnancy, birth and childcare.

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trimester Chart

Congratulations on your pregnancy! Although every pregnancy is different, there are three common stages, called trimesters, that women go through during their nine months of pregnancy. The best way to ensure a healthy pregnancy and healthy baby is the regular follow up with your doctor.

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  • 4

    Week 4

    This week is the beginning of the embryonic period. From now all of your baby's organs will begin to develop, and some will even begin to function. As a result, this is the time when your baby will be most vulnerable to anything that might interfere with the development. Also present now are the amniotic sac, which will house your baby; the amniotic fluid, which will cushion him/her as s/he grows; and the yolk sac, which produces your baby's red blood cells and helps deliver nutrients to her until the placenta has developed and is ready to take over this duty. Now you should be taking your vitamins also do not take any medications without your doctor’s consultation.
  • 9

    Week 9

    Your baby now is about the size of a grape. s/he's starting to look more and more human. Your baby's heart finishes dividing into four chambers, and the valves start to form – as do her tiny teeth. The organs, muscles, and nerves are kicking into gear. The external sex organs are there but won't be distinguishable as male or female for another few weeks. Eyes are fully formed, but her eyelids are fused shut and won't open until 27 weeks. Tiny earlobes, and her mouth, nose, and nostrils are more distinct. The placenta is developed enough now to take over most of the critical job of producing hormones. Now that your baby's basic physiology is in place, she's poised for rapid weight gain. You still may not look pregnant, even if your waist is thickening a bit. You probably feel pregnant, though. Morning sickness and other physical symptoms in full force for most women. Mood swings are common now – it's perfectly normal to feel alternately elated and terrified about becoming a parent. Try to cut yourself some slack.
  • 13

    Week 13

    Fingerprints are forming on your baby’s tiny fingertips, veins and organs are clearly visible through her/his thin skin, the body is starting to catch up with her head – which makes up just a third of her body size now. If you're having a girl, she now has more than 2 million eggs in her ovaries. Your baby is almost 7.62 cm long and weighs nearly 28 grams. This is the last week of your first trimester, and your risk of miscarriage is now much lower than earlier in pregnancy. More good news: Many women also notice a distinct increase in their sex drive around this time. Birth is still months away, but your breasts may have already started making colostrum, the nutrient-rich fluid that feeds your baby for the first few days after birth, before your milk starts to flow. You may be eating for two, but you don't need twice as much food.

1st Trismester

0.4kg - 2.0kg
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  • 18

    Week 18

    Your baby is about 13 cm long, and he weighs almost 198 gram (about the size of a bell pepper). S/he's busy flexing her/his arms and legs – movements that you'll start noticing more and more in the weeks ahead. Her/His blood vessels are visible through his thin skin, and his ears are now in their final position, although they're still standing out from his head a bit. If you're having a girl, her uterus and fallopian tubes are formed and in place. If you're having a boy, his genitals are noticeable now, but he may hide them from you during an ultrasound. You are experiencing an increase in appetite and specific food. Choose meals and snacks that are rich in nutrients instead of empty calories. Bigger, more comfortable clothes are a must now as your baby and waistline grow. Your cardiovascular system is undergoing dramatic changes, and during this trimester your blood pressure will probably be lower than usual. Don't spring up too fast from a lying or sitting position or you might feel a little dizzy. From now on, when you do lie down, it's best to lie on your side – or at least partly tilted to one side. (When you lie flat on your back, your uterus can compress a major vein, leading to decreased blood return to your heart.) Try placing a pillow behind you or under your hip or upper leg for comfort.
  • 22

    Week 22

    28 cm long and 453 gm weigh, your baby is starting to look like a miniature newborn. His/Her lips, eyelids, and eyebrows are becoming more distinct. Eyes have formed, the irises (the colored part of the eye) still lack pigment. Now your belly is showing, people might start touching it. It's perfectly okay to tell folks who touch your tummy that you'd rather they didn't. And if people are telling you that you look smaller or bigger than you should at this point, remember that each woman grows – and shows – at her own rate. You may start to notice stretch marks on your abdomen as it expands to accommodate your growing baby. At least half of pregnant women develop stretch marks by the time they give birth. These small streaks of differently textured skin can range from pink to dark brown (depending on your skin color). Although they most commonly appear on your tummy, stretch marks may also show up on your buttocks, thighs, hips, and breasts. There's no proof that lotion helps prevent stretch marks, but keeping your skin moisturized may help with any itching.
  • 27

    Week 27

    This week, your baby weighs almost 900 gm (about the size of a head of cauliflower) and is about 37 cm long with her/his legs extended. S/he's sleeping and waking at regular intervals, opening and closing her/his eyes, and perhaps even sucking her fingers. With more brain tissue developing, your baby's brain is very active now. While her/his lungs are still immature, they would be capable of functioning – with a lot of medical help –if s/he were to be born now. Chalk up any tiny rhythmic movements you may be feeling to a case of baby hiccups, which may be common from now on. Each episode usually lasts only a few moments, and they don't bother her, so just relax and enjoy the tickle. The second trimester is drawing to a close, and as your body gears up for the final lap, you may start noticing some new symptoms. Along with an aching back, for example, you may find that your leg muscles cramp now and then. They're carrying extra weight, after all, and your expanding uterus is putting pressure on the veins that return blood from your legs to your heart as well as on the nerves leading from your trunk to your legs. Unfortunately, the cramps may get worse as your pregnancy progresses. Leg cramps are more common at night but can also happen during the day. When a cramp strikes, stretching the calf muscle should give you some relief. Straighten your leg and then gently flex your toes back toward your shin. Walking for a few minutes or massaging your calf sometimes helps, too.

2nd Trismester

2.0kg - 8.0kg
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  • 31

    Week 31

    This week, your baby measures over 40 cm long and weighs about 1.5 kg (about the size of a coconut) and is heading into a growth spurt. S/He can turn his head from side to side, and his/her arms, legs, and body are beginning to plump up as needed fat accumulates underneath his/her skin. S/He's probably moving a lot, too, so you may have trouble sleeping because your baby's kicks and somersaults keep you up. Take comfort: All this moving is a sign that your baby is active and healthy. Many women feel these random contractions – called Braxton Hicks contractions – in the second half of pregnancy. Often lasting about 30 seconds, they're irregular, and at this point, they should be infrequent and painless. Frequent contractions, on the other hand – even those that don't hurt – may be a sign of preterm labor. Call your doctor immediately if you have more than four contractions in an hour or any other signs of preterm labor. These include an increase in vaginal discharge or a change in the type of discharge (if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody – even if it's pink or just tinged with blood); abdominal pain or menstrual-like cramping; an increase in pressure in the pelvic area; or low back pain, especially if you didn't have it before. You may have noticed some leaking of colostrum, or "premilk," from your breasts lately. If so, try tucking some nursing pads into your bra to protect your clothes. (If not, it's nothing to worry about. Your breasts are making colostrum even if you don't see any.) If your current bra is too snug, you might also want to pick up a nursing bra. Choose a nursing bra at least one cup size bigger than you need now. When your milk comes in, you'll be grateful for that extra room.
  • 36

    Week 36

    Your baby is still packing on weight. S/he now weighs almost 2 Kg 700 gm, and is more than 47 cm long (about the length of a head of romaine lettuce). S/he's shedding most of the downy covering of hair that covered her body, as well as the vernix caseosa, the waxy substance that covered and protected her skin during her nine-month amniotic bath. Your baby swallows both of these substances, along with other secretions, resulting in a blackish mixture called meconium that will form the contents of her first bowel movements. At the end of this week, your baby will be considered "early term." (Full term is 39 to 40 weeks. Babies born before 37 weeks are preterm, 41 weeks is late term, and those born after 42 are post-term.) Most likely your baby is already head-down. But if not, your doctor may suggest scheduling an external cephalic version. That's a fancy way of saying that your healthcare provider will apply pressure to your abdomen to try to manipulate your baby into a head-down position. Now that your baby is taking up so much room, you may have trouble eating a normal-size meal. Smaller, more frequent meals are often easier to handle at this point. On the other hand, you may have less heartburn and have an easier time breathing when your baby starts to "drop" down into your pelvis. This process – called lightening – often happens a few weeks before labor if this is your first baby. (If you've given birth before, it probably won't happen before labor starts.) If your baby drops, you may also feel increased pressure in your lower abdomen, which may make walking increasingly uncomfortable, and you'll probably find that you have to pee even more frequently. If your baby is very low, you may feel lots of vaginal pressure and discomfort as well. Some women say it feels as though they're carrying a bowling ball between their legs.
  • 40

    Week 40

    It's hard to say for sure how big your baby will be, but the average newborn weighs about 3.7 kg (about the size of a small pumpkin) and is about 50 cm long. Her/his skull bones are not yet fused, which allows them to overlap a bit if it's a snug fit through the birth canal during labor. This so-called "molding" is the reason your baby's noggin may look a little pointy after birth. Rest assured – it's normal and temporary. After months of anticipation, your due date rolls around, and ... you're still pregnant. It's a frustrating, but common, situation. Some women have prolonged pregnancies for no apparent reason. You still have a couple of weeks before you'll be considered "post-term." But to be sure your baby is still thriving, your doctor will schedule you for testing if your pregnancy continues. You may have a biophysical profile (BPP), which consists of an ultrasound to look at your baby's overall movements, breathing movements (movement of her chest muscles and diaphragm), and muscle tone (whether she opens and closes her hand or extends and then flexes her limbs), as well as the amount of amniotic fluid that surrounds her (important because it's a reflection of how well the placenta is supporting your baby). Fetal heart rate monitoring (called a nonstress test or NST) will generally be done as well – by itself or as part of the BPP. Or, you may have what's known as a modified BPP, which consists of an NST and an ultrasound to assess the amount of amniotic fluid. If the fetal testing isn't reassuring – the amniotic fluid level is too low, for example – you'll be induced. If there's a serious, urgent problem, you may have an immediate c-section. Your doctor will also check your cervix to see if it's "ripening." Its position, how soft it is, how effaced (thinned out) it is, and how dilated (open) it is can all affect when and how your labor is induced. If you don't go into labor on your own, you'll be induced, usually sometime between 41 and 42 weeks.
*units in weeks

3rd Trismester

8.0kg - 13.6kg

Week 4

  • This week is the beginning of the embryonic period.
  • All of your baby’s organs will begin to develop, and some will even begin to function.
  • Present now the amniotic sac, which will house your baby; the amniotic fluid, which will cushion him/her as s/he grows; and the yolk sac, which produces your baby’s red blood cells and helps deliver nutrients.
  • Now you should be taking your vitamins also do not take any medications without your doctor’s consultation.

Week 9

  • Your baby now is about the size of a grape. s/he’s starting to look more and more human.
  • Your baby’s heart finishes dividing into four chambers, and the valves start to form – as do her tiny teeth.
  • The organs, muscles, and nerves are kicking into gear.
  • The placenta is developed enough now to take over most of the critical job of producing hormones.
  • Morning sickness and other physical symptoms in full force for most women.

Week 13

  • Fingerprints are forming on your baby’s tiny fingertips, veins and organs are clearly visible through her/his thin skin.
  • If you’re having a girl, she now has more than 2 million eggs in her ovaries. Your baby is almost 7.62 cm long and weighs nearly 28 grams.
  • Your risk of miscarriage is now much lower than earlier in pregnancy.
  • You may be eating for two, but you don’t need twice as much food.

Week 18

  • Your baby is about 13 cm long, and he weighs almost 198 grams (about the size of a bell pepper).
  • S/he’s busy flexing her/his arms and legs – movements that you’ll start noticing more and more in the weeks ahead.
  • You are experiencing an increase in appetite and specific food. Choose meals and snacks that are rich in nutrients instead of empty calories.
  • Don’t spring up too fast from a lying or sitting position or you might feel a little dizzy. Try placing a pillow behind you or under your hip or upper leg for comfort.

Week 22

  • 28 cm long and 453 gm weigh, your baby is starting to look like a miniature newborn.
  • Now your belly is showing, people might start touching it. It’s perfectly okay to tell folks who touch your tummy that you’d rather they didn’t.
  • And if people are telling you that you look smaller or bigger than you should at this point, remember that each woman grows – and shows – at her own rate.
  • You may start to notice stretch marks on your abdomen as it expands to accommodate your growing baby.

Week 27

  • This week, your baby weighs almost 900 gm and is about 37 cm long with her/his legs extended.
  • With more brain tissue developing, your baby’s brain is very active now. While her/his lungs are still immature, they would be capable of functioning.
  • Chalk up any tiny rhythmic movements you may be feeling to a case of baby hiccups, which may be common from now on.
  • You may find that your leg muscles cramp now and then.

Week 31

  • Your baby measures over 40 cm long and weighs about 1.5 kg (about the size of a coconut).
  • S/He can turn his head from side to side, and his/her arms, legs.
  • S/He’s probably moving a lot, so you may have trouble sleeping because your baby’s kicks and somersaults keep you up. All this moving is a sign that your baby is active and healthy.
  • Frequent contractions, on the other hand – even those that don’t hurt – may be a sign of preterm labor. Call your doctor immediately if you have more than four contractions in an hour or any other signs of preterm labor.

Week 36

  • Your baby now weighs almost 2 Kg 700 gm, and is more than 47 cm long.
  • At the end of this week, your baby will be considered “early term.” (Full term is 39 to 40 weeks. Babies born before 37 weeks are preterm, 41 weeks is late term, and those born after 42 are post-term.)
  • Most likely your baby is already head-down. But if not, your doctor may suggest scheduling an external cephalic version.
  • Now that your baby is taking up so much room, you may have trouble eating a normal-size meal. Smaller, more frequent meals are often easier to handle at this point.

Week 40

  • The average newborn weighs about 3.7 kg (about the size of a small pumpkin) and is about 50 cm long.
  • Some women have prolonged pregnancies for no apparent reason. You still have a couple of weeks before you’ll be considered “post-term.
  • Fetal heart rate monitoring (called a nonstress test or NST) will generally be done as well – by itself or as part of the BPP.
  • If there’s a serious, urgent problem, you may have an immediate c-section.
  • If you don’t go into labor on your own, you’ll be induced, usually sometime between 41 and 42 weeks.

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